the entire show

(via avalava)

lannistersex:

"THAT SHIRT WITH THOSE SHOES?"

lannistersex:

"THAT SHIRT WITH THOSE SHOES?"

(via swarveashell)

seven-tongued-harlot:

Photos on the set of Taxi Driver by Steve Schapiro, 1976 (via)

There are still some things I don’t like about this movie, but the problem with that is that I can’t point them out to you.

That’s probably what makes this film so great; it arouses disgust and negativity in order to bring merit to the praise it has been given. It’s a chiaroscuro skyline portrait of the verifiable civilized hell that New York can be. Travis is a concentrated personification of what many of us wish we could do: bring justice to the wrongs that no one else seems to care about, or even notice.

80slove:

Road Warrior

(via damianteeth)

cinephilearchive:

“It was the possibility of doing a purely cinematic film. You have an immobilized man looking out. That’s one part of the film. The second part shows what he sees and the third part shows how he reacts. This is actually the purest expression of a cinematic idea.” —Alfred Hitchcock

François Truffaut: To my mind, ‘Rear Window’ is probably your very best screenplay in all respects. The construction, the unity of inspiration, the wealth of details.
Alfred Hitchcock: I was feeling very creative at the time, the batteries were well-charged. John Michael Hayes is a radio writer and he wrote the dialogue. —François Truffaut, Hitchcock

Read, learn, & absorb: John Michael Hayes’ screenplay for ‘Rear Window’ [pdf]. (NOTE: For educational purposes only)

When it came to his career, John Michael Hayes experienced the heaven and hell of Alfred Hitchcock. The four films they made together in a remarkably short period of time during the mid-1950s—‘Rear Window,’ ‘To Catch a Thief,’ ‘The Trouble with Harry,’ and ‘The Man Who Knew Too Much’ (1956 version)—would seem to provide the defining moments of Hayes’s résumé. But an initially harmonious working relationship turned sour. According to Hayes, Hitchock nurtured the fledgling screenwriter only to betray him ultimately. —John Michael Hayes: Qué Sera, Sera, interview by Susan Green

Based on a Cornell Woolrich short story, the screenplay for ‘Rear Window’ was Hayes’ first project with a major director. A keen writer of dialogue, Hayes quickly understood that because Hitchcock grew up in silent films, he had a tendency to rely on the camera as much as possible. He later recalled: “I caught some of that spirit. Hitchcock taught me about how to tell a story with the camera and tell it silently.” The critic Chris Wehner takes up this idea in a 2002 interview with John Michael Hayes in which he discusses the writing of ‘Rear Window.’ It provides a fascinating insight into Hayes’ working methods and his relationship with the great director. —John Michael Hayes: On Writing Rear Window

Reads/Watches/Listens:

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(via wanderbymistake)

dailybreakingbad:

Posting from an alternate timeline with less violence and more grateful dead.http://dailybreakingbad.tumblr.com/

dailybreakingbad:

Posting from an alternate timeline with less violence and more grateful dead.
http://dailybreakingbad.tumblr.com/

(via we-are-trainwrecks)

walter white per season appreciation

(via heisenbergchronicles)

heisenbergchronicles:

Dave Porter’s Original Score for Breaking Bad Gets Wide Release on Vinyl

Says Porter: “I’m excited to share this release with fans of the show and record enthusiasts looking for a better listening experience than an mp3 could ever offer…a sound much closer to the version that came out of my studio.” Available for preorder on Amazon.

My name is Walter Hartwell White. I live at 308 Negra Arroyo Lane, Albuquerque, New Mexico. 87104. To all law enforcement entities, this is not an admission of guilt. I am speaking to my family now. Skyler, you are the love of my life. I hope you know that. Walter Junior, you’re my big man. There are… there are going to be some things, things that you’ll come to learn about me in the next few days. I just want you to know that, no matter how it may look, I only had you in my heart. Goodbye.

(via heisenbergchronicles)

shallow-existences:

The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (1974)

shallow-existences:

The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (1974)

(via culthorrorfilms)